Home Made PCB – Arduino Prototype Shield (Part 3)

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This is Part 3 and also the final part of my journey in making my first home made PCB. If you’ve not read the previous parts, here is Part 1 and Part 2.

My aim of this project is to create my own Arduino Prototype Shield. With the PCB done, it’s time to turn to the components that will be mounted on the board.

Nothing spectacular, just some connectors and a mini breadboard.

There’s a reason why I chose a dark blue breadboard. The truth is I’m very particular about colour schemes. When possible I’ll always coordinate the colours in the things that I buy or make, for example my desktop computer that I assembled myself. Everything in it has to be in the right colour or matching colour. I guess I have colour OCD lol.

Coming back to this project, the PCB that I bought is actually yellow in colour but unfortunately, I can’t find it in any other colour. It looks absolutely disgusting. This is a PCB I did in college.

I have no control over that project because we were required to follow instructions. But this is my own project so I’ve got to do something about it and I bought this.

A white spray paint. I wanted a white – dark blue – black colour scheme. I think it’ll look awesome 🙂

This is the board after painting. Took a full day to dry because I applied a very thick coat. It actually looks very shiny but the camera did not pick that up.

Then I drilled holes for the components to go through and soldered the components.

Pardon my soldering skills. It’s been a long time since I used a soldering iron, I’ve been relying on breadboard too much these days.

This is how it looks like the right side up.

The last step would be to stick the mini breadboard on it.

Here is the final product in a few angles.

The Arduino Prototype Shield mounted on my Arduino Uno R3.

Lastly, I did this just for laughs. Arduino on an Arduino lol.

That’s the end of my project and I hope that you’ve enjoyed reading it. Thank you 🙂

  1. pcb assembly11-08-2012

    Excellent post. I want to thank you for this informative read. Keep up your great work.

  2. Sharky06-27-2012

    Great set of articles bro! Enjoyed reading them and probably might do one on my own. Thanks for putting these up!

    • Wai Hung06-29-2012

      Thanks 🙂 hope it’s useful to you.

  3. tytower03-03-2012

    So What are the copper tracks that are underneath and unsoldered for ?
    There is a lot of circuitry there which just is not used?

    • waihung03-03-2012

      Actually the Arduino Prototype Shield can be two things, a perf board or a breadboard.
      If you want to solder things on it, don’t need to stick a breadboard. Can solder your own circuit.
      But for me, I rely heavily on breadboard, so I chose to stick a breadboard on top of it instead.

      For more info, here is a Prototype Shield by ladyada.
      http://www.ladyada.net/make/pshield/
      You can either solder your circuit on it or stick a breadboard.

      Thanks for the comment 🙂

  4. vick03-02-2012

    OMG, bro!! Pro!!

    Nice working.

    Hvae never done that yet.
    Hey oh ya, how about the protective coating ? The copper will easily oxidise easily isnt that ?

    • waihung03-02-2012

      Thanks 🙂
      I didnt apply any protective coating on the copper side. If oxidise also just leave it la lol.
      But before I solder i got use sand paper to get rid of the oxidation first.

      Shouldn’t affect any thing except for the looks.

    • MM,Também achei que a reacção e a postura dele foi "business as usual…". O que não demonstra propriamente profissionalismo, mas, como bem indica, cinismo. Não acreditei na rábula da maçã podre, mas cada vez mais acho que também ele não é um homem sério.

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